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Security in payment transactions thanks to HSM from Securosys

The previous system for payment transactions in Switzerland, SIC 3, will be deactivated: As of July 2017, the successor version SIC4 will go into operation. This is secured with the Primus HSM S500 from Securosys. It will process transactions in the amount of up to 480 billion Francs per day. What were the requirements for the system, which factors contributed to its success, and how does Securosys now stand?

The success story of the Primus HSM S500

 

Quantum Computers - A Threat For PKI?

What are the prerequisites for a secure PKI today? Will quantum computers make PKIs obsolete in the future? Could blockchain provide a solution? The speakers attended such questions at a SIGS event. Another question also discussed was when quantum computers would be ready for production at all.

Quantum Computers - A Threat For PKI?



Papers

How to attack a provenly secure algorithm and harden it thereafter

Why do encryption algorithms, even if recognized as highly secure by the cryptographic community, show unexpected weaknesses? How does information need to be encrypted and corresponding algorithms modified, assuming that attackers are able to exploit side channels using high-precision measurement tools? A research team from Securosys and the University of Applied Science (HSR) in Rapperswil, Switzerland, worked on exactly these topics in a project supported by the Federal Commission for Technology and Innovation (CTI). The findings of this project are available now. In their report, the researchers from the Institute of Microelectronics and Embedded Systems (IMES) and Securosys show, how an elliptic-curve-based (ECC) algorithm is successfully attacked at first, and how slight modifications lead to robustness against side-channel attacks.

On Power-Analysis Resistant Hardware Implementations of ECC-based Cryptosystems

Roman Willi, Paul Zbinden (IMES HSR) and Andreas Curiger (Securosys).

Project supported by the Federal Commission for Technology and Innovation (CTI).


Probably the most efficient architecture for ECC-based authentication

The digital signature is an effective method to protect information from modifications by fraudsters. However, the more sophisticated the attacks of cybercriminals get, the more complex authentication algorithms have to be decommissioned. This additional complexity increases execution time and requires additional computing resources. In a project, In collaboration with the University of Applied Science (HSR) in Rapperswil, Switzerland, Securosys has investigated ways to protect information in the future. The researchers of the Institute for Microelectronics and Embedded Systems (IMES) have developed, among other, a computing architecture, which, to the best of their knowledge, is most effective for calculating ECC-based algorithms, which are often used in connection with digital signatures.

Flexible FPGA-Based Architectures for Curve Point Multiplication over GF (p)
Dorian Amiet, Paul Zbinden (IMES HSR) and Andreas Curiger (Securosys).
Project supported by the Federal Commission for Technology and Innovation (CTI).



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